Overlord Show

Overlord Show

101st Airborne

101st Airborne

During World War II, the US 101st Airborne took part in Operation Overlord (the D-Day landings and airborne landings on 6 June 1944, in Normandy, France). The famous Screaming Eagles also played a major role in Operation Market Garden, the liberation of the Netherlands and the Battle of the Bulge around the city of Bastogne, Belgium.

Sexton self-propelled gun

Sexton self-propelled gun

The WW2 British Army Sexton self-propelled gun was based on the American M3 and M4 tank chassis. The Sexton was equipped with a 25 pounder, which fired 3.45 inch (25lb) high explosive (HE) or armour-piercing (AP) shells. Around 2,000 were built between 1943 and 1945 seeing service with the British, Canadian and many commonwealth forces. The Sexton was widely displaced by the American M7 Priest, equipped with 105mm gun mounted on the M3 chassis.

British Army Sexton self-propelled gun

British Army Sexton self-propelled gun

M3 Gun Motor Carriage

M3 Gun Motor Carriage

The American M3 Gun Motor Carriage was equipped with one 75 mm gun. It saw widespread use in North Africa, Italy and the Pacific. Around 2,200 M3s were built before the M10 Tank Destroyer superseded it. Many M3 gun carriages were later converted back to standard M3A1 half-tracks.

Paratrooper: 101st Airborne

Paratrooper: 101st Airborne

WW2 Living History

WW2 Living History

American M3 Gun Motor Carriage

American M3 Gun Motor Carriage

The American M3 Gun Motor Carriage was equipped with one 75 mm gun. It saw widespread use in North Africa, Italy and the Pacific. Around 2,200 M3s were built before the M10 Tank Destroyer superseded it. Many M3 gun carriages were later converted back to standard M3A1 half-tracks.

SdKfz 2 Kettenkrad

SdKfz 2 Kettenkrad

The German SdKfz 2 or Kettenkrad was a half-tracked motorcycle built as a light tractor for airborne troops. The vehicle was designed to be delivered by Ju-52 transport aircraft. It first saw service in the summer of 1941 against the Soviet Union, where it was used to lay communication cables, pull heavy loads and carry soldiers. Later, the Kettenkrad was used as a runway tug for jet aircraft, such as the Messerschmitt Me 262. In order to save aviation fuel, German jet aircraft were routinely towed to the runway. The Kettenkrad saw service in North Africa and the Western Front. Around 8,300 were built during the war. Later, production resumed and another 500 were produced for farming until manufacture finally stopped in 1948.

BMW R75 Motorcycle and Sidecar

BMW R75 Motorcycle and Sidecar

The German Army BMW R75 motorcycle and sidecar was designed for reconnaissance troops. However, it proved tough, reliable and multipurpose. The R75 could be equipped with an MG34 machine gun for fire support plus standard infantry weapons. Initial production was planned for 20, 200 units but that target was never achieved. To learn more about the R75 visit MilitaryFactory.com

http://www.militaryfactory.com/armor/detail.asp?armor_id=229

The Overlord Show 2017

The Overlord Show 2017

German Army BMW R75 with MG42

German Army BMW R75 with MG42

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German Leichter Panzerspähwagen

German Leichter Panzerspähwagen

The German Leichter Panzerspähwagen (2 cm) was a four wheeled, lightweight reconnaissance vehicle.This version of the vehicle was armed with a 2 cm KwK 30 L/55 autocannon and a 7.92 mm MG 13 machine gun. The crew was increased to three by the addition of a gunner, relieving the commander of that task. In 1938, the MG 13 was replaced by the MG 34, in 1942 the KwK 30 was replaced by the faster firing KwK 38 of the same calibre. Production ran from 1937 to late 1943, with at least 990 vehicles being produced for the army.

MG 34 general-purpose machine gun

MG 34 general-purpose machine gun

The German Maschinengewehr 34 or MG 34 is a recoil-operated air-cooled machine gun, introduced in 1934. It accepts the 7.92mm Mauser cartridge, and is generally considered the world's first general-purpose machine gun. The MG 34 has a high rate of fire, around 900 rounds per minute. However, the design proved too complex for mass production, and was supplemented by the cheaper and simpler MG 42, although both remained in service and production until the end of the war. The MG 34 remains in service with some armies today. In this photo we see a member of the Waffen-SS using the MG 34 in a typical infantry support role.

For more information visit Wikipedia

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